$5.00 OFF to New Customers : Use SAVEME5 Customer Service: +15867316101   |   Support
Australia
0
 Shopping Cart
Items in your shopping cart Quantity Price
Subtotal: AUD$0.00
AUD$0.00

Homeopathic Skin Care Remedies For Sensitive or Problem Skin

Whether you have eczema, psoriasis or just sensitive skin, we have the homeopathic solutions that could help bring back your radiance. . Learn more at eVitamins, the largest online health Australia superstore.
1.
AUD$74.93
2.
AUD$56.39
3.
AUD$10.29

We take our skin for granted a lot of the time. It keeps a lot of gross stuff out and keeps good stuff in, even if it does burn in the sun. Like most things about our body, we only really notice our skin if something's wrong. Skin conditions can be irritating, chronic and painful and unfortunately a lot of them don't have a cure. But you don't have to suffer anymore because we've found some homeopathic ways to treat sensitive skin and skin conditions.

Many turn to homeopathic remedies to treat all kinds of sensitive skin even if they're seeing a doctor. Some of these are a simple change in routine while others you may find yourself asking your dermatologist about. If you're only suffering from sensitive skin, try making one of these changes and see how it helps.

Wardrobe Change

Wearing softer fabrics against the skin can help ease irritation. Natural fabrics like bamboo, cotton and silk are great. You don't have to change the entire closet right now, though. Washing your clothes in cleaner detergent will help keep unnecessary dyes, fragrances and chemicals off your clothes. Don't know what cleaner detergent is? Try this post on green cleaning.

Always make sure to wash new clothes before wearing them or you risk extra dyes or chemicals rubbing off on your skin. And if you really want to look harder at your fashion, try going for natural clothing without synthetic colors.

Bathe Better

Not all bathing is made equal. Hot showers can irritate skin and soaking for too long will actually dry it out. (How's that for weird science?) Try taking showers that are lukewarm or at least not dragon-fire-hot and cut them down to 20 minutes. The longer you go in between washing, the better. Going every other day won't strip skin of the natural oils it uses to keep moisturized. Use natural soaps without fragrances or extra chemicals to keep from irritating or drying it out more.

If you're flaring up, try taking a bath. One of these should help:

Magnesium
  • Lukewarm water
  • 1-2 cups of epsom salt or magnesium flakes
  • 1/2 cup Himalayan or sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp natural vanilla extract
  • 10-15 drops of essential oil of your choice

  • 1/2 cup bleach for full tub (1/4 for half bath)
  • Soak for 10 minutes
  • No more than 3 times a week
  • Consult a doctor first

  • Baking Soda
  • Add 1/4 cup of baking soda to water
  • Mix and allow to dilute
  • Add in preferred oatmeal or other oils (optional)

  • Oatmeal
  • 3/4 uncooked oatmeal
  • 1 tsp lavender buds
  • 1 tea bag of chamomile
  • Tie up in a coffee filter, tea bag or muslin fabric
  • Soak

  • Never submerge your face or head into a bath. If problem areas exist on your face, gently wet with a damp clothe and rinse. Remember the skin on your face is more sensitive so be aware of a more drastic reaction.

    Diet Diary

    The idea of diet influencing outbreaks whether it be acne or eczema is up in the air at the moment. Many think allergic reactions are a separate case and elimination diets don't work while others note the correlation between food triggers and outbreaks. I'm going to say tracking your diet and outbreaks could help. I'll explain why.

    Allergies can be like potholes. Sometimes they've always been there, you just never knew it until you hit one. And sometimes when you do hit it, it's not that big of a deal until you hit it too hard and wreck your car. You can have a mild allergy all your life and it won't be a problem until it's suddenly a problem. Tracking outbreaks with your meals may help pinpoint certain allergies you didn't know you ever had. This study shows that reactions can be instantaneous or take up to 48 hours and sometimes they're both. Keeping track and then looking over the findings once a week could help you discover whether you're lactose intolerant or if you should cut back on the gluten. This is how they found out chocolate doesn't cause acne.

    Talk to your doctor about an elimination diet if you have any suspicious about potential food triggers.

    Stress Management

    Honestly, there is nothing in the world that stress doesn't make worse. It ruins dates, the armpits in dress shirts and now our skin. Stress can trigger flare ups for simple acne so keeping it in check is a good way to decrease potential rash outbreaks. Easier said than done, I know. I'm going to go ahead and recommend:

  • Your favorite television show marathon

  • In the end, you're the only one that will know how to relax and getting into the finer details of stress management is a much longer blog post. However, knowing stress will trigger an outbreak could help you plan for it even if you can't find a way to prevent it.

    The Herbal Approach

    These are the herbal supplements and skin care regiments passed down from the internet to me and now onto you. I've tried my best to get proof of these treatments. And never, ever, ever put raw fruit on your face. Put down the lemon, you're making it worse. Try:

    Coconut Oil - Because what isn't it good for? Apply topically for a natural moisturizer.
    Turmeric - The antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of the curcumin in turmeric may help improve skin growth and reduce scarring. Creams, gels or soaps with a 5-10% concentration could help improve the look of skin.  
    Chamomile - Both topical and oral studies showed anti-inflammatory results on sites. 
    Hemp Seed Oil - Topically applied, it reduces itch and strengths skin to infection. Taken orally it was also shown the fatty acids in the oil improved eczema symptoms. 
    Echinacea - topically apply to psoriasis sites or use orally to treat acne. 
    Arnica - A cream with 15% arnica oil is said to help reduce inflammation. Used for too long or in too high a dose, however, Arnica can be irritating. 



    Whether you're suffering from sensitive skin or something a lot more painful, these tips should help you get on the right track to managing symptoms. What are your tips on keeping skin healthy? Tell us on our Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Talk to you doctor before making any changes to diet. If you think you have a skin condition, make an appointment with a dermatologist before making any drastic changes. It could just be poison ivy from your last hike.  

    Thanks for reading and turn in next week for another healthy blog!


    More Sources: X, X, X
    Share:
    Related Articles You May Like
    Dealing With Dry Winter Skin
    Dealing With Dry Winter Skin
    Our Favorite Products to Use for Different Skin Conditions
    Our Favorite Products to Use for Different Skin Conditions
    Your Guide to Spotting Skin Cancer
    Your Guide to Spotting Skin Cancer


    RELATED CATEGORIES
    Castor Oil

    Foot Care

    Hand & Nails

    Skin Care for Body

    Skin Care for Face

    Skin Conditions

    Skin Vitamins

    Tamanu Oil

    Acne Treatment

    Age & Brown Spots

    Blemish - Scar Treatment

    Eczema

    Psoriasis



    Skin Conditions products you may like:
    Home Health Products Blemish Treatment Lotion
    Reviva Labs Skin Lightener For Day Fade Cream
    Burt's Bees Natural Acne Solutions Moisturizing Lotion
    Alba Botanica Acne Dote Invisible Treatment Gel
    Salcura Naturals Antiac Acne Clearing Spray
    Derma E Psorzema Natural
    Coupons & promos
    Sign Up
    eVitamins Australia, Copyright 1999-2016. All Rights Reserved.

    Statements made about specific vitamins, supplements, procedures or other items sold on or through this website have not been evaluated by eVitamins or by the United States Food and Drug Administration. They are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. The information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. As always, please consult with a licensed doctor or physician before starting any diet, exercise or supplement program, before taking any vitamin or medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a problem.

    Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions