Welcome
Sign In
Where Is My Order? | Re-Order
0 items: $ Checkout
 Shopping Cart
Items Qty Price Per Unit
You have zero items in your shopping cart.
Subtotal: $0.00
Free Shipping for order +49
A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Zinc

Refine
Refine Results
Brands
PRICE
  •  
  •  
  •  
FORMAT
POTENCY
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
FLAVOR
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

What is Zinc and how it works

Share ThisLike on FacebookPin on Pinterest
Zinc: Main Image

How to Use It

Moderate intake of zinc, approximately 15 mg daily, is adequate to prevent deficiencies. Higher levels (up to 50 mg taken three times per day) are reserved for people with certain health conditions, under the supervision of a doctor. For the alleviation of cold symptoms, lozenges providing 13–25 mg of zinc in the form zinc gluconate, zinc gluconate-glycine, or zinc acetate are generally used frequently but only for several days.

Where to Find It

Good sources of zinc include oysters, meat, eggs, seafood, black-eyed peas, tofu, and wheat germ.

Possible Deficiencies

Zinc deficiencies are quite common in people living in poor countries. Phytate, a substance found in unleavened bread (pita, matzos, and some crackers) significantly reduces absorption of zinc, increasing the chance of zinc deficiency. However, phytate-induced deficiency of zinc appears to be a significant problem only for people already consuming marginally low amounts of zinc.

Even in developed countries, low-income pregnant women and pregnant teenagers are at risk for marginal zinc deficiencies. Supplementing with 25–30 mg per day improves pregnancy outcome in these groups.

People with liver cirrhosis appear to be commonly deficient in zinc. This deficiency may be due to cirrhosis-related zinc malabsorption.

People with Down’s syndrome are also commonly deficient in zinc. Giving zinc supplements to children with Down’s syndrome has been reported to improve impaired immunity and thyroid function, though optimal intake of zinc for people with Down’s syndrome remains unclear.

Children with alopecia areata (patchy areas of hair loss) have been reported to be deficient in zinc.

The average diet frequently provides less than the Recommended Dietary Allowance for zinc, particularly in vegetarians. To what extent (if any) these small deficits in zinc intake create clinical problems remains unclear. Nonetheless, a low-potency supplement (15 mg per day) can fill in dietary gaps. Zinc deficiencies are more common in alcoholics and people with sickle cell anemia, malabsorption problems, and chronic kidney disease.

Facebook ShareTwitter Share


Zinc Benefits
Here is what people are saying about the benefits of Zinc.
Zinc Picolinate  Review
Read Reviews >
ZMA Review
Read Reviews >
First Defense Review
Read Reviews >
Zinc 10 mg Review
Read Reviews >
Read more Zinc benefits >

Copyright © 2011 Aisle7. All rights reserved.

Coupons to your inbox
Facebook Share Facebook Share
Stay Connected with eVitamins:
eVitamins.com, Copyright 1999-2014. All Rights Reserved.

Statements made about specific vitamins, supplements, procedures or other items sold on or through this website have not been evaluated by eVitamins or by the United States Food and Drug Administration. They are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. The information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. As always, please consult with a licensed doctor or physician before starting any diet, exercise or supplement program, before taking any vitamin or medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a problem.
Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions